Ali Sydney

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PhD Graduate

Sunflower Networking Group

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Kansas State University

PS. This page is not actively maintained.





Contents

Contact Information

Email: asydney [at] ksu [dot] edu

About Me

I obtained my B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering at the United States Naval Academy in May 2007. My capstone project encompassed the design and implementation of microprocessors to support the Naval Academy's Small Satellite Program.

Additionally, I obtained my M.S. In Electrical Engineering at Kansas State University in August 2009 and currently pursuing my PhD at K-State.

Research Interests

  • – Software Defined Networking
  • – Security and QoS in Cyber Physical Systems (including Smart Grids)
  • – Future Internet Architecture
  • – Robustness of Complex Networks
  • – Network Performance and Optimization
  • – Network Virtualization

Teaching Experience

EECE 241: Introduction to Computer Engineering. Fall 2007-Spring 2011

Publications

Journals

  • A. Sydney, J. Nutaro, C. Scoglio, D. Gruenbacher, N. Schulz

Simulative Comparison of Multiprotocol Label Switching and OpenFlow Network Technologies for Transmission Operations

IEEE Transactions on Smart Grids, Volume 4, Issue 2, pages 763-770, 2013.


  • A. Sydney, C. Scoglio, D. Gruenbacher

Optimizing Algebraic Connectivity By Edge Rewiring

Applied Mathematics and Computation, Elsevier, Vol. 219, Issue 10, Pages 5465–5479, 2012


  • A. Sydney, C. Scoglio, M. Youssef, P. Schumm

Characterizing the Robustness of Complex Networks

Int. J. Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, Volume 2, Nos 3/4, pp. 291-320, 2010


  • C. Scoglio, W. Schumm, P Schumm, T. Easton, S. Chowdhury, A. Sydney, M. Youssef

Efficient mitigation strategies for epidemics in rural regions

PLoS ONE 5(7): e11569. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0011569, 2010


Conferences

  • A. Sydney, C. Scoglio, D. Gruenbacher

The Impact of Optimizing Algebraic Connectivity in Hierarchical Communication Networks for Transmission Operations in Smart Grids

IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT), pages 1-6, 2013.


  • A. Sydney, C. Scoglio, P. Schumm, R. Kooij

ELASTICITY: Topological Characterization of Robustness in Complex Networks

in Proceedings of IEEE/ACM Bionetics, Hyogo, Japan, 2008

Posters

Presentations & Articles

  • Presented a poster and video, P. Schumm, A. Sydney, C. Scoglio, A Complex Network Approach to Control Epidemics in Rural Regions, at NSF Cyber-Physical Systems Luncheon for U.S. Senate Commerce Committee July 2009, Hart Senate Office Building, Washington D.C.

Internships

  • Raytheon BBN Technologies

Summer 2010

PROJECT 1

Networking Test Suite for OpenFlow Campuses

PROJECT 2

WebServer Application to view traffic between campuses: Designed using Javascript, PHP, and Ajax

PROJECT 3

Quanta LB4G OpenFlow Switch (Configure, evaluate, document)

PROJECT 4

Video Wall: Deployed a 16 screen video-wall for Network monitoring

PROJECT 5

SNAC: Evaluated this OpenFlow Policy Manager

Summer 2011

Project 6 GENI Monitoring Slice: Enabling Network Visibility in the GENI OpenFlow Core Network

GENI:Global Environment for Network Innovation


K-State Is now an OpenFlow Enabled Campus in GENI

K-State's participation in GENI

K-State now has L2 access through I2 to other campuses and research facilities on the research backbones (I2 and NLR). Additionally, K-State now supports the GENI API and with the latest deployment of OpenFlow on campus, K-State is fully capable to support OpenFlow, ProtoGENI, PlanetLab experimenters.

OpenFlow, NOX, And FlowVisor

The link below desribes how to configure the Pronto 3290 switch:


How to configure the Quanta "Pronto 3240" LB4G Switch


The link below desribes the following:

  • How to configure the Quanta 3290 Switch
  • How to install FlowVisor and NOX
  • How to piece together your Quanta "Pronto 3290" switch, Flowvisor, and NOX

NB. The following links are from my personal experience with the mentioned OpenFlow products. However, a more detailed configuration can be found from the OpenFlowHub webpage. From the "Projects" link on the top menu, you can select Indigo, to view details on the all Indigo related switches. What may be of immediate interest is the following link:

Up and Running on the 3290 or 3780

Yet another important link may be the web GUI for switch management


   Alternate TFTP server configuration for your Pronto 3290 Switch 
  • The following link provides a diagram which shows one possible network setup of the Pronto 3290 OpenFlow Switch, FlowVisor, and NOX. NB. You can always connect the switch directly to the NOX controller. FlowVisor simply allows connectivity between multiple controllers and switches :

Quanta 3290, FlowVisor, and NOX


Below are some useful OpenFlow related links:


For those interested in converting a regular computer into a multilayer virtual switch, Open vSwitch is the solution:

Open vSwitch: An Open Virtual Switch


For others interested in a policy manager (somewhat like a glorified firewall) for your switch, try SNAC:

OpenFlow Downloads: SNAC

OpenFlow, NOX, FOAM, OMNI, FlowVisor, Emulab: Integrating your OpenFlow resources with GENI

The embedded file provides details to allow one to share OpenFlow resources (such as OpenFlow switches) with GENI. In particular, it takes you through the steps in: 1. Obtaining an Emulab user account

2. Installing and configuring FOAM: the OpenFlow Aggregate Manager (AM)

3. Installing and configuring FlowVisor: the tool used to "slice" or allocate OpenFlow resources (such as ports on your OpenFlow switch)

4. Installing and configuring OMNI: the command line tool for reserving resources across control frameworks (such as OpenFlow and PlanetLab)

5. Installing and configuring NOX: the OpenFlow controller that will forward packets between hosts connected to OpenFlow switches

The details of this embedded file will provide you the links, tips, and instructions to understand how all these packages work together to allow you to share and utilize GENI resources. Please download this file here.

Future Internet Architecture

The NSF has invested $8 million to four projects for building Future Internet Architecture. Below are the list of links for each projects. In my humble opinion, you may want to first visit the Named Data Networking Project by Van Jacobson:

1. Content-Centric Networking: This link is the home of the project which includes a reference implementation that you can try out. NB. You may want to view the video presentation from the following link to CCNx get an understanding of how the mechanisms work.

Named Data Networking: This link provides useful video presentations for this project. As a starter, you may want to scroll to the bottom of this next link to view a high level, 6 minute overview on how CCNx works.

2. Mobility First: This project is focused on wireless applications

3. NEBULA: This project is geared towards Cloud computing applications

4. eXpressive Internet Architecture: This projects re-evaluates the entire OSI stack.


Questions? Suggestions? Snide remarks? Shoot me an email: I am more than happy to listen and to assist!



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